Next stop, San Francisco!

Pier 15 at the Exploratorium; NOAA seawater chemistry monitoring buoy in the foreground. Photo: Mary Miller
Pier 15 at the Exploratorium; NOAA seawater chemistry monitoring buoy in the foreground. Photo: Mary Miller

The NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown will be making a mid-cruise pit stop tomorrow in San Francisco! We’ll spend just under 24 hours tied up at Pier 15, right outside the Exploratorium science museum’s Fisher Bay Observatory. There’s a practical reason for this port call; seven scientists have completed their mission and will disembark, and we’ll be taking on sixteen new researchers for the second half of the cruise up the U.S. west coast into Canada. After days of rough weather, we won’t be sorry for a few hours on solid ground (please, no earthquakes!), but we’ll be sad to say goodbye to our colleagues (at least until the next scientific conference).

Incredible photo of the bow of our boat in rough seas. Photo credit: Jonathan Sharp
Incredible photo off the bow in rough seas. Photo credit: Jonathan Sharp

This will not be the first time the Exploratorium has hosted a NOAA ship; they view themselves as an “educational port of opportunity” and often provide docking facilities for fisheries and oceanographic research vessels. In exchange, scientists are invited to use the museum’s life sciences lab to work on their sample collections and to give talks to the public about their research.

This Saturday (May 21) is no exception! At 2pm, NOAA Cruise Chief Scientists Simone Alin and Richard Feely, and University of Washington biologist Nina Bednarsek will share observations from this cruise and discuss their ongoing research on ocean acidification on the California Current ecosystem.

Pteropods spp spp mixed in with some copepods caught from a Bongo net tow.
Pteropods (free-swimming marine snails) collected from the California current. Photo: Melissa Ward

After these talks, expedition scientists and their colleagues from the nearby Romberg Tiburon Center for Environmental Studies will share live pteropods (right)

and phytoplankton specimens (like the harmful algal Pseudo-nitschzia species, below) that shut down this past winter’s popular and lucrative West Coast Dungeness crab season. The public is welcome! More information here.

Pseudo-nitzschia, the harmful algal species that shut down shellfish fisheries along the U.S. West Coast last year. Photo: NOAA Fisheries.
Pseudo-nitzschia, the harmful algal species that denied many San Francisco residents their traditional holiday crab feast. Photo: NOAA Fisheries.

 

 

 

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