35 Sunsets Later: Closing thoughts

After 35 days at sea (replaying the following video 35 times will give you a rough idea), we thought we would ask each member of the scientific team what their experience was like, rather than write a one-sided view of an individual’s experience.

Continue reading “35 Sunsets Later: Closing thoughts”

Tracking ocean acidification across political boundaries: NOAA-Hakai Institute collaboration

The Pacific Ocean has no borders. However, tracking ocean conditions across political borders requires coordination and collaboration. The Hakai Institute’s two coastal ecological observatories are situated almost perfectly at the center of the British Columbia-sized geographical gap between Washington and Alaska. With scientific facilities on both Calvert and Quadra Islands in British Columbia, the Hakai Institute is uniquely placed to add a Canadian complement to NOAA’s ocean acidification monitoring in US waters. Continue reading “Tracking ocean acidification across political boundaries: NOAA-Hakai Institute collaboration”

Farewell San Francisco!

The NOAA Ship Ronald Brown left the Exploratorium dock Monday afternoon. Our collaborator Bill Cochlan shared these photos of the ship leaving the Bay, and the new at-sea blog coordinators Spencer Showalter and Meghan Shea put together a short video that perfectly captures the excitement of young scientists heading to sea!

Carbonate: The Building Block of Marine Life

Seashells use calcium carbonate to build their shells. Photo Credit: Melissa Ward

Next time you are walking along a beach, pay attention to how many unique types of shells you see: scallops, gastropods (snails), oysters, pteropods, and many other marine organisms rely on shells for protection and housing. Just as humans build our homes from brick and wood, these marine organisms build their homes out of a chemical compound called calcium carbonate. Continue reading “Carbonate: The Building Block of Marine Life”

Ring Around the Rosette: The Science of Seawater Sampling

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Taking CTD Samples offshore from Baja California Sur, Mexico. Photo credit: Melissa Ward

In the open ocean, water can be thousands of feet deep. When oceanographers need to test seawater from such depths, how do they get their samples? The most experienced divers can only go to a few hundred feet, and even then, a diver can only bring back as much seawater as he or she can carry.  Therefore, specialized equipment is needed in order to obtain samples from the deep ocean. A CTD rosette is often the equipment of choice for such a task. Continue reading “Ring Around the Rosette: The Science of Seawater Sampling”