What would you name the CTD?

You’ve seen the CTD in action in Ring around the Rosette and read about all the different types of samples we take. But for all the incredible scientific opportunities the CTD provides, we still don’t have a name for her (or him!).

The CTD posing majestically on the deck at sunset. Photo Credit: Meghan Shea
The CTD posing majestically on the deck at sunset. Photo Credit: Meghan Shea

We asked scientists onboard for their suggestions. Continue reading “What would you name the CTD?”

Synergy in the Near-Shore

Three federal agencies partnered to sample this section of the Olympic coast on June 1. Image Credit: OCNMS
Three federal agencies partnered to sample this section of the Olympic coast on June 1. Image Credit: OCNMS (click for a larger view).

Early Wednesday morning, the NOAA Ship Ronald Brown reached Station 120, within spitting distance (for a ship) of Cape Flattery, the northwesternmost point of the continental United States. After collecting samples by starlight, the ship swung round and headed south, back towards the wild stretch of Washington coastline that is recognized for its extraordinary natural history by three federal designations – the Washington Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Olympic National Park (ONP) and Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS). Continue reading “Synergy in the Near-Shore”

Sampling the Columbia River Plume

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Ensign Lydia Ames captions our entry into the Columbia River. Photo Credit: Bill Nilsson

The Columbia River is particularly important to unraveling the dynamics of coastal ocean acidification in the Pacific Northwest because it brings waters with elevated temperatures and oxygen concentrations and lower salinities, pH values, and aragonite saturation states compared to open ocean waters into the coastal environment. Continue reading “Sampling the Columbia River Plume”

Ring Around the Rosette: The Science of Seawater Sampling

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Taking CTD Samples offshore from Baja California Sur, Mexico. Photo credit: Melissa Ward

In the open ocean, water can be thousands of feet deep. When oceanographers need to test seawater from such depths, how do they get their samples? The most experienced divers can only go to a few hundred feet, and even then, a diver can only bring back as much seawater as he or she can carry.  Therefore, specialized equipment is needed in order to obtain samples from the deep ocean. A CTD rosette is often the equipment of choice for such a task. Continue reading “Ring Around the Rosette: The Science of Seawater Sampling”

It’s called a test station for a very good reason…

Dolphins at sunset
Silver fish flash their greetings
Then we troubleshoot.

We left San Diego under nearly perfect conditions, with partly cloudy skies and lower winds than the previous few days.  We arrived at our test sampling station just about sunset, under the escort of our diminutive dolphin* guides.  Continue reading “It’s called a test station for a very good reason…”