Tracking ocean acidification across political boundaries: NOAA-Hakai Institute collaboration

The Pacific Ocean has no borders. However, tracking ocean conditions across political borders requires coordination and collaboration. The Hakai Institute’s two coastal ecological observatories are situated almost perfectly at the center of the British Columbia-sized geographical gap between Washington and Alaska. With scientific facilities on both Calvert and Quadra Islands in British Columbia, the Hakai Institute is uniquely placed to add a Canadian complement to NOAA’s ocean acidification monitoring in US waters. Continue reading “Tracking ocean acidification across political boundaries: NOAA-Hakai Institute collaboration”

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Synergy in the Near-Shore

Three federal agencies partnered to sample this section of the Olympic coast on June 1. Image Credit: OCNMS
Three federal agencies partnered to sample this section of the Olympic coast on June 1. Image Credit: OCNMS (click for a larger view).

Early Wednesday morning, the NOAA Ship Ronald Brown reached Station 120, within spitting distance (for a ship) of Cape Flattery, the northwesternmost point of the continental United States. After collecting samples by starlight, the ship swung round and headed south, back towards the wild stretch of Washington coastline that is recognized for its extraordinary natural history by three federal designations – the Washington Islands National Wildlife Refuges, Olympic National Park (ONP) and Olympic Coast National Marine Sanctuary (OCNMS). Continue reading “Synergy in the Near-Shore”

The crew of the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown: the people who make all this science possible

So far on this blog, we’ve spent a lot of time talking about the scientific work we’ve been doing day in and day out for the last few weeks. We love what we do (some days more than others), and are excited about sharing the results of our month of research in the Pacific.

However, there’s a group of people aboard the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown that our blog hasn’t talked much about, but who are vitally important to this project. They’re the folks who make this expedition possible, who keep the ship and its operations running smoothly behind the scenes, who feed us, and who make sure we stay safe and healthy while aboard. I’m talking about the ship’s crew, without whom we would be a group of dedicated marine scientists who couldn’t make it out of the harbor. Continue reading “The crew of the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown: the people who make all this science possible”

Explora-palooza!

NOAA_Love_Pier15
Chalked on Pier 15 in front of the NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown. Our sentiments exactly! Photo: Meg Chadsey

Our weekend at the San Francisco Exploratorium was a whirlwind of activity! The festivities began just minutes after the gangplank was lowered with presentations by cruise scientists in the Exploratorium’s Bay Observatory, followed by public demonstrations of zooplankton and toxic algae on the main floor. Meanwhile, sixteen new scientists (some from as far away as Finland!) scurried to load their gear onto the ship, while weary Leg 1 researchers stumbled off in search of lattes… Continue reading “Explora-palooza!”

Land Legs

We arrived in San Francisco on Saturday (May 21) to drop some folks off and pick some new ones up. Seven scientists left the boat and sixteen new ones came onboard today. Those of us coming off the boat after 16 days at sea had some wobbly legs to start, and for those not used to the infamous ‘dock rock’ we were forewarned that you feel it most when you are in a confined space… Vertigo!

Continue reading “Land Legs”

Next stop, San Francisco!

Pier 15 at the Exploratorium; NOAA seawater chemistry monitoring buoy in the foreground. Photo: Mary Miller
Pier 15 at the Exploratorium; NOAA seawater chemistry monitoring buoy in the foreground. Photo: Mary Miller

The NOAA Ship Ronald H. Brown will be making a mid-cruise pit stop tomorrow in San Francisco! We’ll spend just under 24 hours tied up at Pier 15, right outside the Exploratorium science museum’s Fisher Bay Observatory. Continue reading “Next stop, San Francisco!”

Acidifying Seas – Investigating OA impacts in the intertidal zone

Looking North along the intertidal zone at the very tip of Point Loma, in Cabrillo National Monument. Photo: Johnny Jones
Looking North along the intertidal zone of Cabrillo National Monument, at the very tip of Point Loma. Photo: Johnny Jones
https://www.nps.gov/cabr/planyourvisit/maps.htm
Cabrillo National Monument on Point Loma; intertidal samples were collected samples from the tidepool beach on the lower left. Credit: National Park Service.

If the scientists unloading onto the Ron Brown had taken a moment to look up from their boxes of equipment yesterday, they might have noticed a small Navy vessel cruising past the Point Loma Light Station. Continue reading “Acidifying Seas – Investigating OA impacts in the intertidal zone”

A View from the East

Point Loma Naval Base San Diego; https://www.flickr.com/photos/kenlund/5143862373
Naval Base Point Loma from Cabrillo National Monument, Point Loma, San Diego, California. Photo: Ken Lund (Flickr Creative Commons)

We’re off! The NOAA Research Vessel Ronald H. Brown left the San Diego Naval Base this afternoon and started ‘heading for the border’… Past it actually; the first transect lies more than 500 miles to the south, off the west coast of Baja California, a region more famous for its wintering population of eastern Pacific gray whales than its carbonate chemistry.  Continue reading “A View from the East”