Wiley Evans, Hakai

Mission Scientist, Hakai Institute, British Columbia, Canada

 

Bio: I lead the Hakai Institute’s new Ocean Acidification Program; my research on ocean chemistry in the North Pacific is integrated with the Hakai Oceanography program, and helps monitor British Columbia’s ever-changing oceans. Learn more about my colleagues and their research here.

Wiley received a PhD in oceanography from Oregon State University in 2011, working under Burke Hales. Prior to joining Hakai, Wiley was a post-doctoral scientist at University of Alaska-Fairbanks, and a research associate at NOAA’s Pacific Marine Environmental Laboratory.

Hakai chemical oceanographer Wiley Evans (right) and Oregon State professor Burke Hales (left) install Canada’s first Burke-o-Lator machine for measuring ocean acidification in the waters off Quadra Island, British Columbia. The beer bottles on the floor, after being cleaned, are used to store water samples from other locations before testing. Photo Credit: Josh Silberg, Hakai Institute.
Hakai chemical oceanographer Wiley Evans (right) and Oregon State professor Burke Hales (left) install Canada’s first Burke-o-Lator machine for measuring ocean acidification in the waters off Quadra Island, British Columbia. The beer bottles on the floor, after being cleaned, are used to store water samples from other locations before testing. Photo Credit: Josh Silberg, Hakai Institute.

How I’m involved with the 2016 West Coast Ocean Acidification Cruise: I’m studying inorganic carbon chemistry in coastal waters.One of our major objectives during this cruise is to compare Hakai’s laboratory measurements of inorganic carbon levels with those made by the PMEL Carbon Group. The workhorse of our program is the Burke-O-Lator, and this comparison aims to show the accuracy levels we’re capable of hitting relative to the ‘gold standard’ that is PMEL (which I can confidently claim as a former member of that team). We will collect samples from 3 hydrographic lines between Oregon and British Columbia; besides being used for the interlaboratory comparison described above, they’ll help us determine the distributions of inorganic carbon parameters from nearshore to offshore and from the surface ocean to depth in this region. The combined datasets collected by PMEL, the University of South Florida and the Hakai Institute during this cruise will advance our understanding of marine carbonate chemistry along the west coast of North America.